Control

I’ve not written a ‘proper’ blog post in ages, and it’s not for lack of stuff to write: I’ve started this particular post a number of times but it never quite comes out how I want. When I started this blog in 2015 soon after Pudding was diagnosed, the words poured out of me. All the fear and guilt and anger and devastation just had to make it onto the screen in any which way. I barely even had to think about what I was writing, whereas now…things feel more complicated.

This year so far has been one of contrasts. After a very stressful first few months we had a great summer, and I think it can be summed up with one word. Control.

I remember reading an article many moons ago about stressful jobs. It may seem counter-intuitive, but it was saying that the most stressful work wasn’t what you might think. It wasn’t necessarily those in high-powered careers who suffered the most, but those people who had the least control over their work environment. The people who have to react to what’s thrown at them with little or no control over their situation.

Over the last few months I’ve come to realise that this what many of us go through when parenting a disabled child. Before anyone gets upset with me, I don’t mean it’s the child themselves that is the problem. It’s all the other things that impact on our lives  – the lack of accessibility, the fight for support, the forms, the waiting for school places and the never knowing what the future will bring. The control that politicians, budget-holders, pharmaceutical companies have over our children’s lives. That knowledge that your precious wonderful unique child is, to them, a figure in a spreadsheet or just another service user.

When I was writing one of my updates on Facebook recently (come find us here if you haven’t already!) I used the word trauma and then wondered if I was being guilty of over-exaggerating. But actually I don’t think I was – consistent lack of control over your situation IS traumatic.

I never know much about what Pudding is thinking, but it’s pretty clear that the same is true for him. When he can decide where he’s going, or what he does – when he is in control – he is happy.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFor us, the main issue has been Pudding’s health. Not his health now (anyone who sees our photos and videos knows that despite his life-limiting diagnosis he still remains ridiculously healthy) but what is to come. We’ve known since February last year that his body was producing antibodies against the enzyme replacement treatment. Yes, antibodies against that very treatment that is meant to be keeping him alive.

We had to make a difficult decision about whether to go ahead with immune modulation drugs which could result in side effects or increased risk of serious infections. There were also other considerations that had a huge bearing on our decision that I still don’t feel able to talk about. All I can say is that it was a time of agonising changes of mind. How to make important choices on not much information? How to keep going when other people hold all the cards? How to know that we’re doing the right thing when any impact could take years to show what the true benefits have been?

In June we went ahead with the immune treatment – four visits to Manchester over two weeks (four injections and two infusions). Pudding was of course a star, taking even more medical interventions in his stride despite not liking them. Then the waiting started.

The summer has been almost a honeymoon period. With plenty of respite in place for Pudding allowing us to concentrate on fun things with T, and with hope that Pudding’s future was a bit more assured, I felt like I was back in control.

But that assurance is starting to wobble again. Latest results from blood and urine tests have not been very positive and more decisions will be needed soon.

 

6 thoughts on “Control

  1. Linda

    HI Sally
    A thoughtful poignant post as always. Your comments on Control – or lack of it -resonated deeply, particularly recently having watched and waited for our daughter to come through an eight hour operation to remove a brain tumour. What we were not expecting was the trigger that set off was an uncontrollable tsunami of grief from when she was first diagnosed at seven – and yet here she is, like your beautiful little boy, remaining healthy despite all the odds against them … Take care. Linda

    Like

    1. huntersmum

      So glad your daughter is doing well after that operation. That must indeed have been traumatic for you all. I often think about emotions and how they most definitely aren’t just linear in these situations – we can cope brilliantly from day to day, but often the harder stuff just gets stored inside and can frighten/surprise us when it comes out. xx

      Like

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