Seeing things differently

When Pudding was diagnosed with a rare progressive condition that I’d never heard of (I mean, who HAS heard of mucopolysaccharidosis in the course of normal life) I knew that nothing would ever be the same again.

I was right. It hasn’t been. But that doesn’t mean that life is over, that everything will always be bad.

When he was first diagnosed, other parents told me that the first six months to a year were the hardest. I tried to find that helpful but couldn’t really see myself going back to feeling normal again, not feeling all that fear and grief and anger. It just didn’t seem possible.

Five years on, and a friend, another MPS mum, recently messaged me with this photo that she’d just come across in a back copy of the MPS Society magazine. To her, it was just a lovely photo – Pudding reaching over to me as I leaned on his hospital bed.

To me, it was so much more than that. It was a reminder of the day our fears came true. The day, a few months after diagnosis, that we finally got the results from his DNA test, confirming a complete gene deletion and therefore the worst possible outcomes from his condition.

I mentioned that and she immediately apologised, wishing she hadn’t sent it. But as I told her, I truly didn’t mind. For despite the circumstances, I do now love that photo. Yes, it is bittersweet, but it doesn’t just make me think of the worst.

When I see it I also remember the consultant’s face as he told me, and I knew how much he cared. I remember the hug that our specialist nurse gave me as she wished she could do more to make things better. I remember the nurses on the ward not just giving Pudding his treatment, but loving him with all their hearts. I remember being so grateful that my mum was with us on that (as I thought) routine visit. I remember the beauty of the moors as we headed back home along the hated M62 in sunshine.

One photo. So many different ways of seeing it.

In fact, I actually find it hard now to truly remember my feelings from those first few months. Not that I have exactly welcomed MPS into our lives. But I do think I’ve come to much more of an understanding with it. An acceptance that what will be will be.

A lot of the reason I’m free to see things differently at the moment is the wonderful long break we’ve had from hospital. Leaving the clinical trial he was on was difficult certainly, but it has meant that normal life is more ‘normal’ – no more clinical visits, no more psychology tests where I’m hit again and again with the reality of what he can’t do. No more M62!

Pudding’s health continues to be mostly ok for the moment and he’s a lot easier to deal with, being so much quieter than he was. Whilst I know the things that are still to come for us, it’s like we’re in the golden days. The eye of the storm. And I’m liking it here.

I used to hate all those motivational/inspirational memes (still do actually). You know the sort of thing: ‘Special children are only given to special people’ or ‘What doesn’t break you, only makes you stronger’. But I guess one that does ring a bit more true for me now is ‘Whilst you can’t change what happens to you, you can change how you react to it’. Not that I’ve really made any attempt to change. Perhaps it’s more accurate to say that I have been changed.

The next stages in Pudding’s condition may come quicker than I think, or we may still have months or years to make the most of. Who knows, I may see things differently again tomorrow! But until then, I accept.