Fear

Fear. It creeps up on you, doesn’t it?

The whole situation with coronavirus has been a perfect breeding ground really.

I’ve written before about how my anxiety levels seem just naturally higher these days. It started when becoming a stay at home mum: my horizons narrowed and I was no longer pushed to do things that I found stressful. A few years later Pudding’s diagnosis came and things suddenly became that much more limited and worrisome.

And then a worldwide pandemic. Boom! Horizons reduced even further. We’ve been lucky: our home and garden have been very much a safe space for us. With the exception of sporadic trips out for exercise we’ve pretty much stayed put. Yet now shielding advice has been changing and I’ve known for a while that I’d need to venture out into the world again.

Scary.

Logically I know that the risk of me catching anything on a quick trip to the shops is minimal. I can tell myself that till I’m blue in the face. But of course brains don’t always work like that. Logic doesn’t always win over fear.

Last week I beat that fear in a small way. I stepped inside a building other than my house for the first time since the 21st March. It was only taking a parcel to the post office and I’d already paid the postage online. There was one other customer in the shop and it actually wasn’t at all scary.

We will definitely not be going wild and having a family trip to the pub anytime soon, but it felt like a positive step taken.

And then, this weekend the fear bubbled up again. Or should I call it anxiety? Sometimes I know exactly what has triggered it: an argument on social media, a TV programme I’ve watched that has touched a nerve. Sometimes it takes me a while to pinpoint what the cause was.

This time it was a letter received from the government on Friday – a letter that said Pudding is still considered to be in the ‘clinically extremely vulnerable’ group and should remain shielding until August.

cuddle

I know that those letters aren’t always accurate (see below for the explanation) and I know that his consultant was happy for us to start easing into normal life a little more. But I’m obviously well conditioned to respond to authority, despite my reservations about the current government, and that letter tickles all those ‘but what if…?’ nerves.

Logic taking another little holiday.

Well, the weather this weekend hasn’t been very conducive to getting out anywhere anyway. So I have been doing the next best thing – plenty of cuddles with Pudding. Very much like a therapy pet, it is impossible to stay stressed for too long with that soft, warm snuggly body pressed into you.

Fairly difficult to breathe too when he’s lying on top of you, but I’ll take that side effect any day!

 

Shielding letters: at the start of lockdown consultants helped identify groups of patients that could be most vulnerable to the effects of Covid19. All diseases/conditions are described by a code – a bit like the Dewey Decimal system for books. So Pudding’s condition would come under Inherited metabolic conditions, then lysosomal storage condition, then mucopolysaccharidosis, then MPS II Hunter Syndrome. (Don’t quote me on this by the way – I’m not sure of the exact breakdowns, but using this just as an example.) But when the NHS database was accessed in order to send out these letters the data was not able to be broken down in such detail. Therefore, rather than sending out letters to patients with Hunter Syndrome who also have particular risk due to airway issues, a much wider group of patients were targeted. If you have a shielding letter but are not certain whether it should apply to you or vice versa, I’d recommend talking to your consultant to get more individual advice.

4 thoughts on “Fear

  1. Linda

    Hi Sally. It’s been a while since I have read your postings but this morning it just seemed the right time. It was lovely to see you with Pudding and, as always, your writing reached out and touched my heart, helping me understand a little more clearly, just how scary those letters are for those who have received them.

    I send lots of love and virtual hugs your way and a big thank you for carrying on with your blog.

    Linda

    Like

    1. huntersmum

      Haven’t been writing much lately (fear having something to do with that!) but it is always lovely to hear that it can touch people. Thank you!

      Like

  2. kevin willetts

    Funnily enough, (if there is a funny side). Our consultants team said we should follow the guidance and shield until August but he should attend his scheduled check up on the 24th July. I am sure, I dont know enough about Enzyme replacement Therapy and I am not medically qualified however, I know what I see. Rupert has not had treatment since March and I have never seen him look so well. I suppose it must be doing harm that I cannot see.

    Like

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