Today I cry

Today I cry.

This morning I should have got in a taxi to the station with Pudding, caught a train to Manchester and arrived at the hospital. We would have had a lovely greeting from his fan club of nurses and other staff. He would have had a dose of the potentially life-saving drug, just as he has done every four weeks for the last three and a half years. And we’d have whiled away the next four hours with playing and TV in between medical observations.

I am sure that we have made the right decision in withdrawing Pudding from the clinical trial. But that doesn’t stop it being hard. And so I cry.

I cry for the loss of hope. I cry for the loss of his future. 

Pudding with a massive smile, laughing at someone just off camera.

I cry that after three and a half years one of the boys on the trial finally learnt my name and now we won’t see him again.

I cry for the skills he has lost and those he has still to lose.

I cry for the other boys with Hunter Syndrome that never even had the chance of this hope. And I cry for families that have been on trials before that were ended with no choice or input from them.

I cry for the strength I will need to deal with things still to come.

Today I cry. But not for ever.

I don’t have the time. For one thing, it’s production week for our play right now and I’m too busy to spend long in the emotional depths. But also, I think of the reasons that we actually made this decision. One of the huge positives of this choice is to give us more time to enjoy away from the clinical hospital side of things and I am determined not to waste this.

Every time over the last few weeks that I have looked at my gorgeous Pudding, my heart melts even more. And every time I cuddle him, I hold on just a little bit longer. Every minute has become that much more precious.

Less than a week after we saw the consultant for that life-changing discussion I did a talk at Martin House Hospice during their Open Day. I used a talk that I’d written for them on a previous occasion and hadn’t got round to updating it much. Reading through it just before, I knew there was one paragraph that I would struggle to get out without being too emotional and that’s because it had taken on a particular poignancy since I had written it months before.

And most of all Martin House has taught me that a hospice isn’t just a place about dying. Coming here is definitely about having the space and energy to live life to the full and celebrate what we have. And whether we have days, weeks, months or years to spend with our life-limited children, it’s important that we spend them living, not dying.’

And that is what I intend to do.

5 thoughts on “Today I cry

  1. Carole Irwin

    Sending love and strength to you and everyone in your family.
    Remember why you chose this very difficult decision, firstly from Pudding’s point of view, that he struggled with going to the hospital, disliked the treatment and that sadly in your case, it didn’t appear to be improving Pudding’s quality of life. From your point of view you chose to put Pudding’s wishes very bravely before your own and yes now you spend your time enjoying life as much as possible, grabbing those extra long cuddles and making the very best memories you can especially while Pudding has the skills and abilities to do all the things he loves to do. xx💙💙xx

    Like

    1. younggina3

      Enjoy all the happy times together! I’m so sorry, nobody should have to make such an excruciating decision. Hugs and prayers for you and your family. 💕

      Like

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