Rare Disease Day

Today it’s Rare Disease Day and the focus this year is on research. As some of you will know, rare diseases aren’t actually that rare. One in every 17 people will be affected by a rare disease at some point in their life. Every treatment that has ever been made available for any disease is as a result of medical research. Yet for those living with rare diseases (sometimes known as orphan diseases) treatments just aren’t as easily found as research is more costly when it can’t be offset against a large patient base. On the other hand, research into rare diseases is a real trailblazer and can bring about new options for other conditions too.


Some rare diseases are wildly different to Pudding’s diagnosis of Mucopolysaccharidosis (Type II – Hunter Syndrome) and some are much closer. Today I want to tell you about Batten Disease – one very similar to MPS. You’re probably wondering why. After all, this is a blog about Hunter Syndrome and how we’re living with it on a day to day basis.

Well, there was a family on This Morning the other week, and they are living our future right now. Watch it, and you will see so many similarities with our situation: like MPS, Batten Disease is a genetic condition caused by a missing enzyme; children seem healthy at first and are often not diagnosed till around the age of 3; they slowly lose skills such as the ability to talk, walk or swallow; and parents face the agonising fate of watching their children die too early. Way too early.

Like us, this family managed to get their children onto a clinical trial and have seen the drug stabilise their loved ones and even allow a little progress. Unlike others now and in the past who have not received this treatment, these children have a chance at life. Yet NICE have now decided not to make this treatment available in the UK. And there is no way that any individual could afford a drug like this.

This could be us in a few months time.

I know people will, and do, say things like ‘The NHS doesn’t have unlimited funds’, and I understand that. I really do. (Maybe I’ll address those sort of arguments in a future blog.)

But this is the reality of Ultra-Rare Disease. Research is needed so badly, but it is a double-edged sword.

Just imagine it, if you can. Your lovely son or daughter is diagnosed with a life-limiting disorder. You deal with this devastating news however you can. Then you are given some hope – a research trial results in a treatment that is keeping children alive. Yet, because of the country you live in, your child will not continue to receive it. There is a treatment available. But not for your child.

How would you feel?

You can help them by signing a petition asking for this drug to be made available. Please do. You can also follow their journey on Facebook at ‘Ollie’s Army Battling Against Battens’.

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