Over the Wall

On a Tuesday afternoon a few weeks ago, I stood in Leeds coach station anxiously watching the bus in front of me. I was waiting for one face. And there suddenly he was, in unfamiliar clothes, tall, dark and with striking eyebrows. I soon realised the last two were from badly-wiped-off face paint (much of which seemed to be all over his trousers), but after four days away my 9-year old did look somehow taller and more confident.

I had been told about Over The Wall Sibling camps ages ago, not long after Pudding was diagnosed but at that point T was too young (the camps are for 8-17 year olds). This year I thought he was ready but that didn’t stop me worrying about him going off without knowing a single other person there. I needn’t have been concerned – the first question he asked me as we walked out the coach station was ‘When’s the next one?’

I could write a whole blog post about this myself but what’s the point? I wasn’t there experiencing it, so I’ll turn this one over to T. (I interviewed him on your behalf!)

A tie-dyed T-shirt and some trousers covered in face-paint

So tell me a bit about camp. What’s it like? It’s fun cos you do lots of different activities. Some outdoor things like climbing and abseiling. We also did indoor activities like picking a partner and going round a course blindfolded.

Was it just physical activities? No, we made a film where I was the evil genius with a side-kick. And we made tie-dye T-shirts and origami. And after most meals we had a disco and did camp songs. My favourite was one where you’d sing the start of it and then challenge someone to ‘shake your booty’.

How was camp organised? We were in different teams and we all had a T-shirt. I was in orange team which was the youngest. And a few of us shared a bedroom. There were grown up volunteers who took us to the activities and cheered us on.

Did the staff and volunteers do things to help you make friends and boost your confidence? Yes, there were trust things like the blindfold course and holding ropes when someone else was climbing. And we did one thing where we had to write nice things on some clothes pegs and then sneak around and try and pin them on someone without them noticing. I was very good at that! Another thing was when we had to draw round our hand and then everyone in our team wrote what they thought about you.

Origami, a little wooden chest with a friendship bracelet in, a toy monkey, and a picture of a hand with lots of nice comments written on.What was the thing you enjoyed most? Climbing because you had to climb up a log onto a rope onto another log and then there was a ladder and a big net and some tyres to get up. It was really cool.

What was the hardest thing you did?  Abseiling! I hated it at the top cos you have to go backwards and it feels like you’re about to plummet to your death. But unlike some of the others I actually did it and it made me a feel a bit braver.

Were you all very sensible and well-behaved all the time? Er…no. Well, sort of. One morning we woke up at 4am but we stayed in bed till a better time.

What would you say to someone who was a bit nervous about going to camp? Don’t worry about going away. Just do it. It’s fun. I will guarantee you’ll like it!

Did you miss us at all? No! I didn’t even miss Pudding cos I was just too busy the whole time having fun!

 

I think you get the picture. He loved it, and even though I was going down with that horrible tummy bug when I picked him up, I couldn’t keep a smile off my face as he talked non-stop about all the things he’d done. And yes, he had a VERY long lie-in the next morning!

Over the Wall run camps for children with serious health challenges, their families and siblings. Applications are now open for 2020 (T is on the reserve list now, as they quite rightly prioritise people who haven’t been before). The camps themselves, and transport to them from various big cities, are free to all campers. Therefore any donations would be very welcome!

 

Holiday challenges

Trying something new can be difficult. Challenging.

And when you’re making decisions on someone else’s behalf, it’s even easier to stick with the same old things. I know I’m guilty of that with Pudding. I know what he likes and often don’t branch away from the tried and tested. After all, I can’t ask him what he thinks.

CPWe’ve recently come back from a holiday at Center Parcs at Sherwood. A tried and tested formula for us. We go with the whole of my family (parents, Sister, Brother and their children) so there are lots of people around to chat with or do activities. I loved going before Pudding was diagnosed with MPS, and I’ve come to appreciate it even more since. Holidays can be challenging for us in many ways, but I know what we’re getting at Center Parcs. I’ve always found the staff to be really helpful and responsive regarding Pudding’s accessibility needs and they even have a Changing Places toilet in the Sports Centre with another one planned in their pool revamp.

While we’re there, all the other kids get to try out new activities, stretch themselves and their abilities. We find things they like and things they don’t, and that’s ok. And I need to remember that Pudding deserves that chance too.

This holiday I challenged myself and booked him on the Mini Captains Adventure – a boat ride for young children with one accompanying adult. I had suggested that we could draw straws to see who went with him, but no-one else was brave enough!

To be honest, I had no idea what he’d make of it. The success of an outing or activity can depend very much on his mood at the time (and whether he’s had something to eat). But I was prepared for pretty much anything short of being capsized.

It’s often the people we encounter that can make or break an experience for us. I often think Center Parcs have good customer care and the chap running this session was no exception. He was very happy to accept us on our terms and didn’t bat an eyelid when Pudding sat in his wheelchair watching his tablet throughout the safety briefing and instructions.

Grandma, Brother and Sister had come along with us for moral and physical support (very useful when it came to getting the chair across a short stretch of beach), but found it terribly funny when the instructions told us to visit each buoy in turn and note down which picture was on them. I very sensibly decided to ignore them and the instructions!

Pudding looking through the front window of a boat holding onto the steering wheel. I am sitting by him, arm just visible guiding the wheel too.Once the other three boats had set out (again, my decision) we got Pudding out of his chair and took him down onto the jetty. The massive smile on his face made it worthwhile even just for those few seconds. Manhandling him into the right place on the boat was a bit difficult but we did it. And then we set out onto the lake.

He loved turning the wheel, but wasn’t quite so keen on me actually steering so our progress on the water was somewhat erratic! He also loved the occasional person zooming past overhead on the zipwire. I had a feeling though that a good mood wouldn’t last too long, so after a while negotiated back to shore. Seeing his fan club there brought more massive smiles and we even got a picture of him holding his Captain’s graduation certificate.

It was probably the most expensive ten minutes he’s ever spent, but I don’t care. We tried something new!

(PS. I am not being paid for this post and haven’t been asked to promote it, so any advertising is entirely coincidental – just my opinion! Other holiday companies do exist, etc, etc)